One woman's quest for geological understanding!

The day before the adventure….

Well,my bags are packed,my favourite tie-dye baggy trousers repaired, and im good to go!

Tonight im going to finish the preparation of my spanish sentences which I will add to whilst im over there.  :)

Tata for now!  If I get wifi will keep you all updated :)

Tenerife 2013 with the Oxford Geology Group

The information has finally arrived regarding the Tenerife Trip with the Oxford Geology Group!

Continue reading »

Interactive Geology of UK: finding out more about the Geology of Northwich

As some of you might be away, I have recently been looking into the Geology of Northwich, Cheshire, where I live.

Unfortunately Northwich lies on the corner of 4 BGS maps, and matching them up has proved to be unfruitful – so I have started looking around for other resources and came across the following:

Interactive Geology of UK, including boreholes are available through the BGS here:

It is really easy to use and surface features (e.g. faults) can be overlain on the maps, as well as boreholes and wells with associated data to view online where available!

It is a great resource which will be of immense use for some of the private projects I am starting in the near future.

CHECK THEM OUT AND ENJOY!

 

Inquiring Rock Hunters

image003

Do you like rocks and minerals? Would you like to ask questions about rocks and discover more about them?

Maria Aristeidou’s PhD project is to help people engage in scientific investigation, by giving them opportunities to collaborate with scientists and run their own research.

“For this study, I am exploring the involvement of amateur geologists in investigating rocks.”

Please register with the online nQuire platform, which will guide you to design and run investigations of rocks. You will have the opportunity to form your own questions and methods, to reach appropriate conclusions. During your effort you will be supported by tools available on nQuire and also through communication with other participants.

The study will run between 13th – 27thMay and you can visit the platform and spend there as much time as you want. Afterwards, you will have to complete two short questionnaires (5-10 mins each) within one week. In addition, if you agree, you can register to participate in a half an hour online discussion. The nQuire platform will remain active for you to carry on your inquiries.

Continue reading »

Daisy’s Geology website & blog currently under construction

Well, I’m (finally) back online, and you will already notice a difference – firstly my blog and website are in the same place, woohoo!

In the coming weeks, I will be updating the pages one by one, and I beg your forgiveness if they look a little strange during this process!

During the period of host change, I felt very lost, so will now be playing catch-up in terms of writing up my recent exploits, including attending Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects An International Conference held at the Natural History Museum 27-29 March 2013!

Bear with me!

Daisy x

 

What Really Happens in a Flood Basalt Eruption

Holly Ferrie, Geosciences student with the Open University (in addition to being one of my greatest friends) recently wote a guest blog for the Geological Society of London: What Really Happens in a Flood Basalt Eruption.

CHECK IT OUT!

If you enjoy it, look her up on twitter (@cambriangirl1) and read her blog where she has recently reviewed Walking with Dinosaurs!.

Diploma in Geosciences (Awarded 31st December 2012)

I am pleased to announce that I have been awarded a Diploma in Geosciences by the OU.

(https://msds.open.ac.uk/students/study/undergraduate/qualification/E02.htm)

One step closer to the BSc in December 2014!

😀

Have a great week folks!

Daisy x

GeoMapApp – A recommendation from a friend

“GeoMapApp is an earth science exploration and visualization application that is continually being expanded as part of the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS) at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. The application provides direct access to the Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) compilation that hosts high resolution (~100 m node spacing) bathymetry from multibeam data for ocean areas and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) and NED (National Elevation Dataset) topography datasets for the global land masses.”

Download here 

Herdman Symposium 2013 – Geoscience Frontiers

Sooooo looking forward to the Valentines weekend this year!

The Herdman Symposium 2013 – Geoscience Frontiers – will be taking place on 16/2/13 in Liverpool.

There are a great list of speakers planned, and I’m especially psyched to see Dr Ed Llewellin and Prof Paul Wignall’s presentations!

List of Guest Speakers & Titles

  • Dr Roger Benson (Oxford) “Dinosaur evolution and Mesozoic faunas as a guide to biodiversity”
  • Dr Gareth Collins (Imperial) “Impact: Earth! The hazard and mitigation of asteroid impacts”
  • Prof Fergus Gibb (Sheffield) “Nuclear waste: geology has a better answer”
  • Prof Cor Langereis (Utrecht) “The past and future of the Mediterranean”
  • Dr Ed Llewellin (Durham) “Bubble, bang, burp! Big experiments in volcano physics”
  • Prof Paul Wignall (Leeds) “The end-Permian mass extinction and its aftermath: out of the frying pan and into the fire”

The full program can be found here

The Production of Geoscientists: a cautionary tale from the Open University

“Despite global recession, worldwide job opportunities for geoscientists are increasing faster than the number of available applicants. In the US the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 21% growth in this sector in 2010-2020 (Perkins, S. 2011. Geosciences: Earth works.  Nature, v. 473, p. 243–244). That figure does not include jobs freed-up by retirement: the demographics of employed geoscientists in the petroleum and mining industries are skewed markedly to the over-40s, peaking at age 50.”

Read the full article here